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Why We Are in Iraq – April 11, 2019

My poem “Somewhere in the Middle East After One War Ended that’s in Chant of a Million Women (2017) is published in Why We Are in Iraq today.

 

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Magnolia Review – Volume 5 Issue 1 – January 16, 2019

Thanks to Suzanna Anderson for the review of I Exist. Therefore I Am in this issue of Magnolia Review. You can read it at the Magnolia Review site, at Amazon or Goodreads, or see below.

Rajapakse has traveled to India often, and these stories “…were written at two stages of my life and represents the eight years I spent in India, working and travelling to cities and also some of the remote places where I encountered many instances of negativity towards women and girls. Some of the incidents I came across or heard about are too painful to recount or fictionalize. The tales I have included here are a mere fraction of the lives touched during my stay.”

In “Drink Your Milk and Go to Sleep,” a married woman continues to carry girls while her husband and mother-in-law want a boy child. Her family takes her to a midwife who “…was famed for helping women with problems. She must be good because women from all over the land visited her to find solutions to their sorrows. She didn’t talk much. There was no time for any words as it was obvious why we were all there. She had lots of customers like me waiting to be served every day. She gave me something to drink when I got home.”

As a widow, Gayathri Devi was “…waiting to die” in the story “On Death Row.” In the beginning of the story, Gayathri Devi “…had been sitting here in the same place for a while, not caring about what happened around her. She’d seen the colors change in the sky a thousand and one times and more and was no longer interested. Was no longer overjoyed. She no longer anticipated the fading beauty of the end of the day as she did the first time she arrived.” The widows “…were a burden on the young, an unnecessary life that needed to be cared for, fed, clothed and helped along the way. There was no time, no money or room left in houses for the likes of these women that passed their expiration date and were still sitting on the shelf, when whatever little money the families had were needed for the hungry mouths to feed, the demands of school and the dowries to be collected throughout their lives. Women like Gayathri Devi were put aside and left to themselves and what better way to get rid of the unwanted than to send them to God.”

The collection’s title comes from the story “I Exist. There I Am.” Those words are the opening line and the refrain carried throughout the story. “I rest deep inside you, wrapped up tight like an old woman swathed in quilts in the desert during winter when it’s too cold to do anything but sit by the fire and wish it was summer once again.” “You see me through the folds of fat projected onto the screen and can only discern a small shape with a centre that beats like a drum. The sound and rhythm unlike the drums they played at your union, but a drum just the same. Thudak, thudak, thudak, it beats softly. You place your hand on your stomach but you can’t feel me, nor can you hear the drum beats of my heart pounding inside me. Only the machine can tell you that.”

And in “Secrets” “Rules kept the family together, rules made things work the way it was supposed to.”

Each story is heart breaking in its own way. I can’t even begin to imagine the stories that were too painful to recount or fictionalize. Rajapakse’s prose is as strong as her poetry. The characters’ pain is real and their circumstances resonate. I hope for a brighter future.

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Lady/Liberty/Lit – January 1, 2019

What a wonderful way to start the year with a poem published in a Lady/Liberty/Lit. Response to a Man is from #ChantofaMillionWomen 

Response to a Man

January 1, 2019

Shirani Rajapakse

You can’t mold me into

something you want—those

rough hands trying to create

dreams that can only shatter.

You are no sculptor and cannot shape

perfection from mud nor

chisel beauty out of a slab of granite.

I am flesh and blood

just like you.

Not made of clay or rubber that

bends at your will.

Don’t even try to change me

for you will not like the person

I might become in your hands.

Leave me as I am and let me

mold myself as I have done all this while.

I am an individual, a human.

Not a doll made of plastic

or wood that you take out to play

when it pleases you.

Shirani Rajapakse is an internationally published, award winning poet and short story writer. She won the Cha “Betrayal” Poetry Contest 2013 and was a finalist in the Anna Davidson Rosenberg Poetry Awards 2013. Her collection of short stories Breaking News (Vijitha Yapa 2011) was shortlisted for the Gratiaen Award. Her critically acclaimed poetry collection Chant of a Million Women (self published 2017) won the 2018 Kindle Book Awards. It received an Honorable Mention in the 2018 Readers’ Favorite Awards and was chosen as an “Official Selection” in the 2018 New Apple Summer eBook Awards for Excellence in Independent Publishing. Her recently published short story collection I Exist. Therefore I Am is also about women and is set in India. Rajapakse’s work appears in many literary journals and anthologies around the world. Rajapakse read for a BA in English Literature from the University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka and has a MA in International Relations from JNU, India.

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Writing in a Woman’s Voice – November 27, 2018

No One Wants to Know, a poem from Chant of a Million Women was featured in Writing in a Woman’s Voice.

Writing In A Woman’s Voice

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

No One Wants to Know

by Shirani Rajapakse

It was only much later,

when the world had gone to sleep and

awoken many times, that they found out.

By then it was far too late.

People had moved on. Old news was of no use,

they yawned as they picked up the papers

delivered that morning to read the news

crisp and new. Someone lost a cat,

someone broke into a home.

No laws were needed for any of that, no urgent

appeals, that could wait.

But she was only five years old.

They are all silent, those people in high places.

They’ve run out of words, catch phrases they

threw out to the women in jest.

Wrong clothes, out in the dark alone

with a strange man. Of course they deserved it,

those stupid women, they said laughing

behind closed doors.

And now they are scratching their balls and

trying to come up with reasons where

reasons never existed for any of this.

But it’s too late.

Too late for her, the little girl.

Too late for her sisters in other places.

Too late for the mothers whose

daughters died a slow painful death.

Too late, too late. But no one cares.

Not theirs to care.

* * * * *

© 2018 Shirani Rajapakse, “No One Wants to Know” is from the award winning collection Chant of a Million Women (2017) by Shirani Rajapakse

Shirani Rajapakse is an internationally published, award winning poet and short story writer. She won the Cha “Betrayal” Poetry Contest 2013 and was a finalist in the Anna Davidson Rosenberg Poetry Awards 2013. Her collection of short stories Breaking News (Vijitha Yapa 2011) was shortlisted for the Gratiaen Award. Her critically acclaimed poetry collection Chant of a Million Women (self published 2017) is a Finalist in the 2018 Kindle Book Awards. It received an Honorable Mention in the 2018 Readers’ Favorite Awards and was chosen as an “Official Selection” in the 2018 New Apple Summer eBook Awards for Excellence in Independent Publishing. Rajapakse’s work appears in many literary journals and anthologies around the world. Rajapakse read for a BA in English Literature from the University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka and has a MA in International Relations from JNU, India.

shiranirajapakse.wordpress.com

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Chant of a Million Women is at TopShelf Magazine

Chant of a Million Women is featured in the “Spotlights” at TopShelf Magazine.

Or check it below.

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DESIblitz – August, 3, 2018

Here’s a very interesting and thorough look at Chant of a Million Women by Daljinder Johal in DESIblitz. Or read it below.

 

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Magnolia Review -Vol 4, Issue 1.

Thanks to Suzanna Anderson for the review of Chant of a Million Women in this issue of Magnolia Review. Go to pages 179 for the review.

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