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Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards

I entered Chant of a Million Women in the 27th Annual Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards last year. It didn’t win but I got this commentary by the Judge.

 

Judge’s Commentary*:

The variations of form in this collection are wonderful. I loved how the voice of the poet is clear through all of the forms the poems take and that nothing is lost there. It’s a very evocative tone, with each poem’s structure assisting the voice and meaning seamlessly. I loved the poem The Violinist, p. 13, which is able to transport me to the moment so well. The title poem is a wonderful and timely expression (maybe a manifesto?) of womanhood that is empowering to read. I really appreciated the honesty, boldness, and clarity of the words used by the poet. They’re not frothy or extra, they just speak to the truth being expressed and it was very refreshing to read that. Loneliness, p. 31, and Accountable to No One, p. 49, were a couple other favorites. I was impressed with how well the collection as a whole opened my experience, perspective, and viewpoint of the world and the experiences of other women, while also speaking to my own unique viewpoint. That’s not an easy balance to strike and I think it was really spot on. Several of these poems that deal with the difficult realities of womanhood and femininity give words to feelings I’ve had before, and it is my favorite thing when a writer can accomplish that. I really liked this collection and hope the writer continues to express and explore these feelings and experiences.

 

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“Fallen Leaves” out now

Fallen Leaves my latest poetry collection is out now in paperback. You can get it at Amazon. The ebook will follow shortly.

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Description

Rajapakse uses poetry to look at the conflict that raged in the tiny island nation of Sri Lanka for close to three decades. People from all walks of life, ethnic, religious and age groups suffered. The Tamil terrorists disrupted life and property all over the country for three decades, while for a few years in the late 1980s a Marxist guerilla group caused chaos. The JVP was wiped out in a few years. The Tamil terrorists however took much longer.

These poems are a reflection of the time. They take on voices of people from across the divide and speak of the incredible loss the people all suffered.

They are dark yet thought provoking. They speak of a moment in history when people lived amidst a sense of helplessness and fear of terror.
It is dedicated to “all those we lost along the way.”
Blurb

She tried to recall the

day he walked out, the day she

last saw him and the exact moment

she heard his voice on the phone assuring her

all was well. And then

 

no more.

 

What happened? What went wrong?

She would never know. There was no

one left to respond, and those that were there

didn’t dare speak up as the reasons for

what took place didn’t make sense

so they kept quiet and hoped in time

she would understand.

 

Introduction

For close to thirty years the tiny island nation of Sri Lanka was embroiled in conflict.

In the early 1980s the Tamil terrorists – the LTTE – took to war to demand a separate homeland in the north of the country, despite a considerable number of Tamils living in the south. They began intensifying their demands by causing damage in all parts of the country. LTTE women suicide bombers blew themselves up in crowded public places in the mainly Sinhala dominated south, while explosive packed trucks rammed into building destroying lives and infrastructure.  As a response to and protest against the LTTE, the Marxist JVP guerillas created unrest in the south. People who didn’t listen to the JVPs diktats were kidnapped or killed. Those suspected of being JVP members were hauled off by the armed forces and taken in for questioning. No one was safe. Everyday brought fresh news of death or disappearance while bodies burnt on the sides of roads.

The government responded by hounding the JVP and ending their reign of terror within a few years. But not before thousands of young men and women were sacrificed. The LTTE, however, could not be eliminated so easily. They continued to wage war for close to three decades. Attacks on civilians took place so regularly that violence became more common than peace.

And where there was conflict there was devastation. People’s lives changed so drastically that no one ever though they would live to see a day when they could walk the streets unafraid. But that day finally did become a reality in 2009 when the LTTE’s guns were silenced, although it was at a cost to all citizens.

Fallen Leaves is both a look at the past years and a tribute to those fallen heroes, friends and family that never made it. They take on the voices of people from across the divide and speak of the incredible loss everyone suffered. It is also a reminder that guns don’t solve problems, but creates more hardships for everyone.

Part I focuses on the JVP years while Part II looks at the LTTE conflict.

 

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Poets to Come: A Poetry Anthology

What better way to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman than have an anthology of poems from poets that came after him. Over 200 poets are featured in Poets to Come. My poem “On a Saturday Morning” is on page 346.  This is one anthology that is definitely something you must have.

 

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The Dreamers Anthology: Writing Inspired by the lives of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Anne Frank

Two of my poems are included in this anthology that celebrates the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Anne Frank. Congrats to all the other writers featured here and thanks to the editors for putting together this amazing collection.

 

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Pendle War Poetry – 2018 Anthology

Rush Hour, the poem submitted to the Pendle War Poetry Competition, in the adult overseas category, may not have won the competition, but it was selected from the long list to be included in the anthology.

OVERSEAS ADULT POEMS INCLUDED IN 2018 ANTHOLOGY:

Sister Bullwinkle – Paula Miles, Australia
Those Boys – Teresa Hall, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada.
Cesspool Your Name is War – Faleeha Hassan, New Jersey, USA
Indo-Pak Border – FABIYAS M V – KERALA STATE, INDIA
No Doctor To Cry – Jerusha Hackworth – New South Wales, Australia
Far Back In The Dark – Ogunlade John Oluwaseyi, Lagos, Nigeria
Hiroshima n Nagasaki – Seventy+ Years Since 1945 – Matthew Harris – Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, USA
MOTHER EARTH – Cecilia Mallon – Ontario, Canada
WHEN DID WE LAST LIVE? – Yamberzal – Bahrain
Shell Shock Parasite – Gregory Fino, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Bantering with the Dead Soul – Harshita Lall – Dallas, Texas, USA
SYRIAN DESERT– 2015 – Kevin Le Merle – Paris, France.
Memorials – John Seriot – Aurland, Norway.
HEADSPACE – Emily Dentler – Bad Homburg, Germany
Battle of Bloodriver – Jandrie van Staden ,Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa
Never Again – Heather McNair – Auckland, New Zealand
BALLAD OF DEMOKRATIA – Pukhraj Neogi – Lucknow, U. P., India
AMBER – Stephen J. Cribari, Minnesota, USA
“Napalm Girl” with Boy – Frank Joussen – Germany
THE CRY OF WOMEN – Temani Nkalolang – Gaborone, Botswana
An Unknown Soldier? – Paul Barrett – Mystic Park, Victoria, Australia
SPLASH AND SILENCE – Kofie Jerry Atta – Ghana
The Silent VC – Jamie Pinnock – Colgne, Germany
HMS REPULSE & HMS PRINCE OF WALESJeremy Gadd – Sydney, Australia
Barrow – Julian Aiken – Connecticut, USA
The Martyr’s Shrine – Swati Jha – Pune, India
WAITING – Frank Murdoch, Lamma Island, Hong Kong
Lament for Aleppo – Anne Casey – Northbridge, NSW, Australia
Dissociations Of Thirty Three Degrees – Marcelo Moreira – Salvador, Brazil
To Survive Soul – Milos Simic – Kragujevac, Republic of Serbia
”The trajectory of fingerprints in blood” – Cristiane Vieira de Farias – São Paulo, Brazil
Rot – Rhiannon Brönnimann – Brussels, Belgium
Where in Hell is God Now? – Henry Spencer – Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.
The Theatre Of War – D.P.G. Sheridan – Gdansk, Poland
a soldier’s legacy – Nico Volkerts – Texel, Netherlands
Breaking Glass – Richard W. Halperin – Paris, France
THE SANDS OF TIME – Dave Pugh – Burgundy, France
Channel One – Richard Hookway – Banpong, Thailand
War is but an Engagement where Good People die… – Clint Hirschfield – Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin. USA
Rush Hour – Shirani Rajapakse – Maharagama, Sri Lanka
Joy At The Front – Joyce Orsini – Leghorn, Tuscany, Italy