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I Exist. Therefore I Am is available now

I Exist. Therefore I Am is available in paperback at Amazon or in digital form at several digital stores.  You can go straight to Amazon or use the Universal Book Link to get to the other stores. https://books2read.com/iexist

 

 

 

 

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Finalist in the 2018 Kindle Book Awards

Chant of a Million Women is a finalist in the 2018 Kindle Book Awards. Check it out below or go to the official awards page.

2018 Award Winners

Official 2018 Kindle Book Awards

The 2018 Kindle Book Awards is Sponsored by…

2018 Kindle Book Awards2018 Kindle Book Awards

 

 

 

Congrats top-20 category Semi-finalists! Listed in no particular order.

Semi-finalists: Contact jeffbennington@ymail.com to claim your Semi-finalist badge.

Horror/Suspense (Finalists & Semifinalists)

Young Adult (Finalists & Semifinalists)

Romance (Finalists & Semifinalists)

Poetry (Finalists)

Mystery/Thriller (Finalists & Semifinalists)

Non-Fiction (Finalists & Semifinalists)

Literary Fiction (Finalists & Semifinalists)

Sci-Fi/Fantasy (Finalists & Semifinalists)

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Basso Profundo – September 30, 2018

The first review of I Exist. Therefore I Am by Luke Sherwood was published in Basso Profundo. Read it below or go here to the site to read the other reviews.

“I Exist. Therefore I Am” by Shirani Rajapakse

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While reading I Exist. Therefore I Am, I had the sensation of being submerged. I felt trapped deep an endless sea, with no hope of seeing the surface. Author Shirani Rajapakse’s stories of women in modern India has the effect of burying all hope for these females, these second-class citizens. While it is an oppressing collection, it was clearly designed to be so; while its function is to expose and obliquely denounce, its variety does nothing but strengthen and reinforce its message.
Ms. Rajapakse leads off the collection with “Drink Your Milk and Go to Sleep,” and establishes right away the grisly and hopeless tenor of the series. A unfortunate woman has married into a family suffering from the superstitions typical of certain classes of Indian society. So her new family inevitably finds her culpable when she gives birth to female children. This young mother resorts to her only recourse after so many births of the wrong sex again and again. It’s shocking and horrifying.
“Shweta’s Journey” recounts a modern young woman’s descent into household servitude and enslavement at the hands of a purported religious leader. Her naïveté plunges her into this self-obliterating hell; her fear for her life keeps her there.
Even women who have passed a long, satisfying life with family and spouse have an expiration date, apparently. In “Death Row,” Ms Rajapakse recounts the slow, tortuous journey to death of many older widows whose families no longer want them. It matches the bleakness of these women’s spirits with the bleak conditions in which they are forced to live out their days.
The title story features the plaints and exhortations of developing female fetus, and are thus simply inaudible. It echos the heartache of the first story and reflects the devastated lives of so many of India’s women.
Current cultural and religious conflicts have their airing here: young carefree women who have been kidnapped and subjugated into wives by Muslim men hold no hope of ever being rescued, and scant idea of even being missed. This sad state distills the sad theme of the collection into one brief story.
There are ghastly crimes in these pages; there are hopeless laments; each tells a different aspect of the complete pulverization of the female character in India. The author has followed up her award-winning poetry collection, “Chant of a Million Women” with an alarming and sensational collection of short fiction calling attention to the plight of women in India. Pick it up; prepare to be educated and appalled.
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Semi-Finalist in the 2018 Kindle Book Awards

Chant of a Million Women is a semi-finalist in the 2018 Kindle Book Awards.

Or check out all the other categories.

 

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Readers’ Favorite Award certificate and listing on bookawards.com

 

The award certificate just came in. The books is also listed on bookaward.com, referred to as the site for Award Winning Books by Today’s Best Authors. The site is owned and created by Readers’ Favorite and includes only Readers’ Favorite authors.

 

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Readers’ Favorite Awards 2018 – It’s Honorable Mention for Chant of a Million Women

https://storage.googleapis.com/readersfavorite-public/images/honor-shiny-web.pngHonored and thrilled that Chant of a Million Women wins Honorable Mention in the 2018 Readers’ Favorite awards under poetry general category. Thanks to everyone who helped me get here.

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Publisher’s Weekly – First Lines – August 2018

The first line from Chant of a Million Women is featured for August in Publisher’s Weekly along with five other books.

First Lines: August 2018

Our monthly look at some of the best first lines from BookLife authors

August brings books about child smugglers and murderous mothers. To submit a first line, email booklifeeditor@booklife.com.

The Tribal Case by Theresa Janson

“There is peace in not forcing something that by nature will have a force of its own.”

The Big Yank by J.P. Sexton

“I became a smuggler when I was nine.”

Chant of a Million Women by Shirani Rajapakse

“They come to this place every day to touch you.”

Crossing Zero by Dale Brandon

“Danny Fagan never killed anyone on an empty stomach.”

The Bone Field by Leonard Krishtalka

“When the phone rang, Harry Przewalski was stapled to the wall.”

Suffering Ends When Awakening Begins by Jewel Hart

“Even now, more than forty years after the fact, I still have a hard time believing that my mother tried to murder my sisters and me.”